China wants to restrict energy supply – Liam Fox and Robert Macfarlane

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A top priority for sovereign governments is to protect their citizens from dangers – foreign and domestic. We expect the government to be careful.

How slow we are, despite the emergence of new international threats since the end of the Cold War, in particular the threat posed by China’s extraordinary rise to power and its tense grip on world affairs. It’s embarrassing to be.

Beijing operates the second strongest economy in the world and is a major trading partner of the United Kingdom and the United States. Many jobs depend on the huge investment he has made. China has found a path to Britain’s strategic telecommunications, our university, and our nuclear industry.

China and Russia have also expanded into both Africa and South America, acquiring stakes in mineral resources and power distribution.

Maybe our cold war

Perhaps our “victory” in the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union satisfied our leaders with other threats.

Western influencers treat the Chinese as if they are equally responsible members of the global community, ignoring the serious threats they already pose to our way of life. I want But we must not rely on false assurances about China’s global agenda.

For example, we aim to strangle the energy supply on which our daily life depends, and not just essential minerals. Despite its green rhetoric, China remains the world’s biggest pollutant, reckless at home and irresponsible abroad.

On the other hand, our democratic system is threatened by the authoritarian “state capitalism” which it actively promotes around the world.

All of this must be called into question.

In 2013, President Xi Jinping took office, the strategy of expanding China’s influence abroad (known as “unlimited war” internally) was adopted.

Its belt and road initiative seems fairly benign, as it is called, but its purpose is unmistakable.

China has sought to control other nation states with predatory business practices and affordable loans. Through fascinating proposals to build infrastructure, China has gained control over key resources, strategic terrain, and access to distant markets. It seeks political and economic control by relying locally on Chinese goods and services.

Today, China holds 60% of Congo’s cobalt and much of Chile’s lithium (for batteries), and ports like Sri Lanka, Greece and Italy are spread across Europe.

Russia subsequently signed a contract for the construction of four nuclear reactors in Egypt. This is a contract allowing the Russian Navy to use the factory as a supply base.

The Russians are building two more reactors on the Turkish coast. He also has access to the Russian Navy. Moscow already has a naval base in Tartus, Syria.

The collection on this site will have a real impact on the Eastern Mediterranean and the Suez Canal for the Russians.

China and Russia have also expanded into both Africa and South America, acquiring stakes in mineral resources and power distribution.

Today, China has 96 ports in the world. Some of them are in key maritime trade locations, which also means that the energy trade gives Beijing strategic control without the need to deploy a single soldier, ship, or weapon.

This is important for the UK as we continue to depend on internationally traded oil and gas for many years.

Our nuclear power is also at stake. We have already enabled China to invest in a new plant at Hinckley Point in Somerset and a proposed new reactor in Sizewell, Suffolk. And we’re still considering whether to let the Chinese build a reactor at Bradwell-on-Sea in Essex. Indeed, it is a security threat. Will the Chinese be able to penetrate the heart of such a delicate sector for decades to come?

Safe, clean and reliable energy is fundamental for all sovereign states. Without it, nothing will grow. There is no industry, agriculture, education, housing, science or medical care. It is the main means of national security for the country.

Perhaps our “victory” in the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union satisfied our leaders with other threats.

Indeed, President West appears to be less belligerent in the West than, say, Stalin or Khrushchev, admitting that China cannot win or wage a nuclear war. But the Soviet Union was a case of economic basketball. China cannot be easily defeated or sent back, any more than it can.

The lessons of the Cold War, on the other hand, do nothing to undermine authoritarian rule, human rights abuses, attempts to reclaim “lost” territories, or Xi’s desire for imperial ambition.

Efforts to tackle climate change can be a distraction for the Western government. Yes, it is the single most serious threat to the planet today and we need to find a way to reduce the amount of carbon we are releasing into the atmosphere. This is the central theme of the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) in October in Glasgow.

But again, China is trying to exploit the situation.

Today, it is one of the main suppliers of wind and solar systems in the world. Still, the Chinese are just as happy to sell heavily polluted forms of power generation, including coal-fired power plants.

Robert macfarlane

Liam fox

Dr Liam Fox is a former Minister of Defense and International Trade; Robert Macfarlane is a former United States National Security Advisor

China is currently building at least 350 such factories, including seven in South Korea, 13 in Japan, 52 in India and 184 in the country.

The UK has effectively phased out coal from power generation, producing only 1.01% of global CO2 and reducing global emissions by 35.6% since 1990.

In contrast, China produces around 29% of the world’s CO2 and has increased its emissions by 353% since 1990. Very low manufacturing costs allow such dirty technology to be exported with a competitive advantage, but in the meantime bold claims from Xi on reducing emissions, undermining signed climate targets, are absent. Make sense.

Despite the extension of the deadline, China has yet to submit an updated emission plan to COP26. It is used to assess progress towards a legally binding Paris agreement on reducing CO2 emissions.

China has already acquired a dangerous influence over the British government. In 2020, when the UK decided to refuse to offer China a 5G mobile telecommunications system, China quickly pulled out of the job of a major investor, the Hinkley Point nuclear power plant, due to threats from integrated security. I threatened to withdraw.

He threw Britain’s weaknesses into major bailouts.

The journey to meet our climate change goals probably can't mean Britain will become a client state, let alone dangerous foreign powers like China.

The journey to meet our climate change goals probably can’t mean Britain will become a client state, let alone dangerous foreign powers like China.

We need abundant and stable electricity that cannot be provided by wind power generation or solar power generation. The wind cannot blow and the sun cannot strike.

This is why if Britain is to remain a private nuclear power plant, it should look to its allies, especially those of the Five Eyes Group in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States, rather than seek investments and solutions from China. is.

Fortunately, such a solution is at hand. It lies in the development of a new generation of nuclear reactors capable of providing abundant clean energy.

Rolls-Royce has supplied the Royal Navy with jet engines for decades. Our nuclear submarines operate on such a system. A UK engineering company is developing a new generation of Small Versatile Modular Reactors (SMRs) that efficiently meet a variety of energy demands.

These remarkable systems will ultimately be factory built, assembled in the field and give the UK a stronger foundation.

The electricity they produce is available 24/7 and doesn’t emit an ounce of carbon.

Above all, it guarantees the strategic independence of the United Kingdom.

The journey to meet our climate change goals probably can’t mean Britain will become a client state. Not to mention dangerous foreign powers like China.

But we need more than wishful thinking. I still have time to act. Now is the time to do it.

Dr Liam Fox is a former Minister of Defense and International Trade. Robert Macfarlane is a former US national security adviser.


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